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Water Water Water

Thank you for supporting our family owned and operated business!

If you missed it....we were on an episode of ‘Out and About Columbus’ a few week’s ago.  You can check it out here (we’re at 17:35 in the clip).

Let’s face it....next to weeding watering is the second worst garden chore, in my opinion anyway.  But after you spent all that money purchasing the plants & mulch & fertilizer & time planting...you really need to take care of your plants.  Generally we can rely on Mother Nature to give us some help with a good rain once a week but don’t rely on the rain to water thoroughly...especially your containers and hanging baskets.

VEGETABLES:  Whereas flowers can tolerate inconsistent watering, most vegetables cannot.  Fruits and vegetables get their tastiness from all their water and sugar content so the more you water the better results you’ll get with your vegetable crop. 

TREES & SHRUBS:

Water deeply.  Please realize that when you water a tree/shrub, slow, even watering is needed.  It may look like the soil or mulch is wet after you water for two minutes but the soil in the hole will be dry.  The easiest way to take care of this is to barely turn on your hose so that it dribbles out.  Place the hose at the base of the plant and let it run for one hour.  During the dry, hot weather you might have to do this 3 times a week but normally, a deep soaking once a week the first three growing years is best.  Use common sense when watering.  Heavy, clay soil will not drain well and you can drown your tree/shrub if no amendments are added to your soil at planting time.